The January 2020 CJJA Winter Business Meeting was held in San Diego, CA.  The two and a half days of rich content, presentations, think tanks and networking began on Friday with an informative start from MaryLee Underwood, JD Executive Director, Interstate Commission for Juveniles.   Later that afternoon, members successfully passed the Code of Conduct paper, and held the Regional Meetings.

Tim Decker (Social Innovations Partners, LLC) started off Saturday’s session with CJJA Best Practices Committee presentation based on A Roadmap to the Ideal Juvenile Justice System.  A panel and group discussion focused on the intersections and collaboration opportunities between the child welfare and juvenile justice systems was facilitated by Dana Shoenberg and Noah Bien from the Pew Charitable Trusts and featured Utah Director, Brett Peterson who spoke about data driven reforms and their impact on outcomes for youth in Utah. 

Saturday continued with a line-up of subject matter experts including Kim Godfrey (PbS), who provided an overview of best practices on reentry.  Think Tanks on Education and Human Trafficking were led by Simon Gonsoulin and Penny Sampson.  The day concluded with author and sponsor, Matt Burton reading from his book, The Unbound Man, and Best Practices Peer Learning led by Tim Decker.

Sunday morning CJJA members started the day with Brett Peterson and Mike Butkovich’s presentation on Operational Change: A Focus on Dosage.   And, Simon Gonsoulin’s presentation on Emergency Planning wrapped up the day.

CJJA values its relationships with members and strives to make the most of these opportunities to learn and network.  The feedback that is conveyed through surveys shapes meaningful, relevant content at our business meetings.   These meetings rely on the involvement and support of many individuals, who share the same passion for juvenile justice reform exemplified by CJJA.  The staff at CJJA extend a sincere thank you to the incredible line-up of presenters who provided useful tools and strategies to improve outcomes in local and state juvenile justice systems.

%d bloggers like this: